Required Readings

Going back to college, student data, public university research, basing program development on the job market, and more: Required Readings, 06.20.16

I have been extremely overdue in getting out a new Required Readings. When it rains, it pours, and over the past 3 weeks, that pouring has included one vacation that’s not really a vacation (i.e., a visit to the family of origin), one summer cold acquired either from young nieces or fellow airplane passengers, one potentially life-changing interview to prepare for, and a workplace emptied by vacations and illness. But today is the longest day of the year, and I want to put my maximum of daylight to good use. So, here we go.

Why was going back to college to earn a physics degree the hardest thing Skepchick Mindy has ever done? 

What’s at Risk When Schools Focus Too Much on Student Data?

As research at public universities declines, does public trust in science drop as well?

How are former students of for-profit schools creating a debtors’ movement? 

Is it a coincidence that the faculty sponsor of a highly contested Gay Straight Alliance in a Tennessee high school was dismissed from his post after school ended in May?

Are you a teacher in need of fresh questions for writing or discussion? Check out this list of the New York Times‘ Student Opinion question.

How do community colleges use job market data to develop new programs?

Why on earth are public schools using materials from Focus on the Family?

Got education news you want to share with the masses? Send your Required Readings to SoD via our contact form.

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Climate change ed, discriminating vouchers, Wikipedagogy, consent in the classroom, and more: Required Readings, 06.29.16

librarienne

librarienne

Librarienne is a university librarian who sees her professional mission as teaching the masses how to separate the wheat from the chaff in today's expanding universe of information, that everything you read requires a critical eye, and how to properly use apostrophes.

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