Culture

The Intentionality Fallacy

If you lookup “intentionality fallacy” you’d probably find a lot of references to literature and other arts, since that is its usual context. We need to start talking about it in other things too. For example, everything. In brief, the intentionality fallacy happens when you are trying to understand, interpret, or …

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Critical Thinking

Why Schools Should Teach Critical Thinking (Final)

This is part five (the end) of a rebuttal to this article. Part one can be found here. There are just two more points I need to address in Hendrick’s article before I am done with my rebuttal. I know, all two of you readers have been waiting with bated …

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CulturePolitics

The Arts Will Save Us–If We Let Them

Those of you in academic and artistic circles have no doubt heard by this point that Donald Trump’s proposed budget for the next fiscal year involves the closure of both the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities, along with several other cultural institutions. There are lots of reasons why …

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Critical Thinking

Why Schools Should Teach Critical Thinking (Part 4)

This is part four of a rebuttal to this article. Part one can be found here. I’d like to move on now to my next point (don’t worry, I’m nearly finished with this series), that Hendrick appears to misunderstand what schools’ purpose is. He says: Since the early 1980s, however, schools have …

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Higher EducationPublishingScience

Gender Studies “Hoax” Shockingly Reveals Scammy Vanity Journals Will Publish Nonsense

When Peter Boghossian and James Lindsay published their recent hoax article “The Conceptual Penis as a Social Construct” in the journal Cogent Social Sciences, they clearly thought they had just majorly dunked on those Foucault-fellating nerds over in the Gender Studies department. “Ha-ha,” they no doubt said, in sing-song Nelson style, while …

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Critical Thinking

Why Schools Should Teach Critical Thinking (Part 3)

This is part three of a rebuttal to this article. Part one can be found here. Hendrick’s next example is even worse than the Shelly one. He wrote: A physics student investigating why two planes behave differently in flight might know how to “think critically” through the scientific method but, without …

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Unemployed men queued outside a depression soup kitchen; the storefront sign reads "Free Soup Coffee & Doughnuts for the Unemployed."
EducationHigher Education

Inexhaustive List of Jobs not Received with a Humanities PhD

Inexhaustive List of Jobs not Received with a Humanities PhD from a “World Class” University Assistant Professor at a University (37) One-Year Visiting Professor at a University (6) Adjunct Lecturer at a University (4) Post-doctoral Researcher at a University (5) (6)* Acquisitions Editor for a University Press Associate Editor for a …

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Critical Thinking

Why Schools Should Teach Critical Thinking (Part 2)

This is part two of a rebuttal to this article. Part one can be found here. One key issue I noted in Hendrick’s article is an odd disconnect from the way he is using the term critical thinking and the way it is used by people like Richard Paul, who …

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Critical Thinking

Why Schools Should Teach Critical Thinking (Part 1)

There was an article that made the rounds last December titled “Why Schools Shouldn’t Teach Critical Thinking.” I read it, and saw various rebuttals online as well as some interesting discussions. I wanted to say something, but couldn’t really frame my thoughts adequately and so dropped it. However, I’ve been …

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Critical Thinking

Where to Begin Thinking Critically?

I realize almost no one will read this, but for the few who do, I have question. (I’ll keep this post short.) Recently, I’ve been thinking about the most basic aspects of critical thinking: where to start a primer for students who have never really encountered it before. While “critical …

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