Critical Thinking

Where to Begin Thinking Critically?

I realize almost no one will read this, but for the few who do, I have question. (I’ll keep this post short.) Recently, I’ve been thinking about the most basic aspects of critical thinking: where to start a primer for students who have never really encountered it before. While “critical …

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Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking: Then and Now

Once again, I am writing about Richard Paul’s work on critical thinking. He wrote a whole lot about it and had excellent things to say. I would strongly recommend checking out the source of what I am briefly touching on here, because he goes into much more detail and depth …

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Critical Thinking

Socratic Questioning 101

In my newfound love of Richard Paul’s excellent work on critical thinking, I bring you another short summary of some of his useful ideas in teaching: a taxonomy of Socratic questions. These can be very useful when thinking of what kinds of questions to ask students when you are trying …

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Critical Thinking

Teaching Critical Thinking: Strong vs. Weak

Recently I’ve been familiarizing myself with Richard Paul’s work on critical thinking and reviewing some of the scientific literature on it. After reading the recent Stanford Study I realized I needed to step up my game when it came to teaching critical thinking. A definition seemed like a good place to …

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Science

An Analogy for Science

I’m planning a series of posts on evaluating sources, especially after the recent Stanford study, but this aspect is a bit adjacent so I’ll write about it separately. In Korea, students have to focus on either sciences or humanities from high school onwards. I teach at a humanities-focused school, and …

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Secondary Education

Collective Nouns for Students

Teaching high school students is exactly like this. Humor aside, there is a real conundrum in working with people that are not quite children and not quite adults. On one hand, adolescents can handle complex and abstract concepts and apply their knowledge in incredibly innovative ways. On the other hand, the …

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Politics

There is no Easy Way

One of the most common reasons given to justify studying history is to learn from past mistakes so they are not repeated. I’ve never really questioned it because it sounded true, but recently I’ve started to become skeptical of this stance for a few reasons. First, when we look back …

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Education

Let’s Just Abandon Debate

Last year, I wrote about problems with debate and made a few points about how the way debate is done in schools is problematic. Now, after having to make another professional dive into it, I find myself needing to clarify and reiterate a few points. As can be said for …

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Government

Don’t Promote “Just Vote”

(Note: To be clear, by “just vote” I am not referring to any organization bearing that name or motto, I am referring only to the phrase in common parlance.) Continuing with my “don’t” theme, it is once again that time where I start hearing the same piece of rhetoric repeated …

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Pedagogy

Don’t Teach “Evaluating Sources”

Okay, so that title was a bit of an attention getter. I’m not going to say that you shouldn’t teach students how to evaluate sources at all, just not necessarily when you think you should. Teachers are faced with the task of figuring out exactly what aspects of their subjects …

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