tap with label fear
Critical ThinkingEducationFeaturedGovernmentPedagogyPrimary EducationReligionSecondary Education

Common Core is going to EAT CHRISTIAN CHILDREN

I never heard of Sandy Rios, of the American Family Association, but you can bet I will be hanging on her every word from now on because she is clearly AWESOME. Check out her measured, thoughtful assessment of Common Core State Standards as she discusses their implications with a gentleman …

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Captain Picard covering face
AtheismCritical ThinkingCultureReligion

I’ve Got Your “Intellectual Snobbery” Right Here

I generally love The Atlantic, but they really shit the bed with me today with this nonsense about “conspicuous atheism.” The problem is, the “culture war” is a false construct created by politicians and public intellectuals, left and right. The state of faith in the world is much grayer, much …

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Romeike Family--two White German parents and 6 White German children
CultureEducationGovernmentReligion

Fox News: Let’s Get Some White Christian Homeschooling Immigrants Up in Here Instead of All These Poor Brown Losers

Every time I think I’ve seen the most intellectually bankrupt excrement Fox News has to offer, they surprise me again. It appears that the universe (Obama) has once again revealed itself to be a cold, unfeeling, unchristian (Obama) place, as an adorable family of (white) Germans who only wish to …

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Higher EducationPedagogy

When a Student Wants To Go Pro-Woo

Well, it finally happened to me. I’m teaching a section of my college’s senior research course, which involves largely self-directed research projects, monitored and mentored (and graded) by the professor. The first assignment I require is a formal proposal so that I can head off any ideas that seem doomed …

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Russell Johnson as The Professor
Critical ThinkingCultureEducationFeatured

Education as Collateral Damage in the War against Experts

My main reason for posting on this topic is to make sure everyone in the world sees Tom Nichols’s post at The Federalist titled “The Death of Expertise.” Click over and read it–it’s not a tl;dr piece–because I think the topic indicates one of the most important cultural conversations we’re …

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martyr cartoon http://mimiandeunice.com/2010/09/20/bonus-cartoon-martyr/
Education

Teaching Is Hard, but the Old Arguments Aren’t Working

This week I read yet another editorial written by a teacher, outlining the vicissitudes of the job and imploring non-educators to recognize our plight and stop blaming us for not magically turning every child into an A+ generating perpetual motion machine. The author wasn’t wrong about anything. I don’t teach …

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Critical ThinkingEducationFeaturedPedagogyScience

Skeptical Approaches to Student Evaluations of Faculty

The college where I dispense wisdom is very small, with fewer than 1000 students. We are a weird little school in a weird, isolated little town, surrounded by much bigger players who suck up most of the (decimated) higher ed budget and leave us with the scraps. Thus, we have …

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A shelf full of books.
Uncategorized

RR: 22 December 2013

Hello, Doubters! Here’s some doubtable (and redoubtable) tidbits for your Sunday afternoon: The New York Times has done the math on public school class sizes and found–shock!–that there are too many students and too few teachers. The Kansas Board of Regents says it can fire professors for using social media …

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print books vs. ereader
CultureFeaturedHigher EducationPedagogyTechnologyUncategorized

The President of McGraw-Hill Higher Ed Wants a Complete Transition to Ebooks by 2015: Is He a Visionary or Just High?

That’s a long title, sorry. I’m also sorry for taking a School of Doubt sabbatical with a couple of snow days and some personal time combined with a bit of sick leave. But I am back with you now, doubters! Shall we do some doubting together? Remember when this happened? …

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EducationPedagogy

Do You Have Too Many Classroom Rules?

The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s recent advice column takes issue with a previous column on the subject of classroom rules. Ultimately, the pro-rules columnist concludes: When I started my academic career I thought it was possible to be a patient, professional teacher while still being rigid enough to maintain a nondistracting …

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