FeaturedRequired Readings

Required Readings, 6 June 2013

Good morning, teachers and learners! First off, let me just say: Tiny lobsters are tearing this country apart. You’ll find out why in the first of our required readings for today. 22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other – Too fascinating to not share with …

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FeaturedHigher Education

Art and Ideology in the Classroom

A graduate student at Northwestern University has been in the news recently for refusing to participate in a concert and consequently being threatened with failing a class. One of the works on the concert programme, a 1957 piece by Howard Hanson entitled “Song of Democracy,” uses text from two poems …

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Critical ThinkingFeatured

Lesson Plan Review: The Skeptic Society’s Skepticism 101 In-Class Exercises

I’m a nuts-and-bolts skeptic, which influences the kind of skeptical lessons I bring into my classrooms. I’m always looking for new ideas and other ways of presenting skepticism and critical thinking to students. I’ve been meaning to start reviewing skeptical curricular materials here at the School of Doubt, so why …

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FeaturedReligion

Dealing With Tragedy as an Atheist

Unless I’m guilty of a particularly morbid form of confirmation bias, it seems like there have been quite a few high-profile tragic events across the world recently. The Sandy Hook shooting, the Boston bombing, the events on the island of Utøya in Norway, and now the terrible scenes of destruction …

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FeaturedHigher Education

Journalism Fail: Weissmann on financial aid.

In a recent article for the Atlantic (linked yesterday on Skepchick), Jordan Weissmann makes the provocative argument that a number of colleges and universities have put in place financial aid systems that effectively bilk lower-income students while lavishing funds upon the already-wealthy. Those of you that have followed my writing …

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FeaturedReligion

Separation of Church and State? Not on MY watch!

Earlier this week, a state judge in Texas, ruled that cheerleaders at public high school football games could make and carry banners with Christian religious verses on them. These banners would be held for football players to run through at the start of the game. Judge Stephen Thomas, in his …

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Critical ThinkingFeaturedHigher EducationPedagogyPrimary EducationSecondary Education

Are Teachers Moral Mentors, or Should We Stick To the Facts?

Hello, readers! I have been MIA for a couple of weeks, but please know that I missed you bunches. Among the many distractions that kept me from your virtual sides was my first half marathon, which allowed me some quality contemplative time. (See photo, in which I am thinking HARD.) …

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FeaturedHigher EducationInformal EducationPrimary EducationScienceSecondary Education

Science Education – An Endangered Species?

I can’t even begin to wrap my brain around the attacks on science and science education that have been dog-piling on since the sequester began. It is as if everyone has just lost it all at once. What’s going on? Phil Plait does a nice job of detailing the latest …

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FeaturedPrimary EducationReligionSecondary EducationUncategorized

Jesus Loves Me This I Know, For My Good Grades Tell Me So

It’s 8:45am and just over three hundred teenagers are sitting in an assembly hall. The youngest sit at the front and the oldest at the back, with almost everyone sporting the identical muted colours of the school’s uniform. The staff form a ring around the edges of the hall, looking …

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FeaturedPop Quiz

Pop Quiz: How to talk to students about tragedy

I don’t know about you, but I’m still reeling from the horrible attacks at the finish line of the Boston Marathon this week. I’ve seen the words of Mister Rogers, a childhood icon of mine, go viral. “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the …

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