Exclusion, Segregation, Integration, Inclusion
EducationPedagogySecondary EducationSpecial EducationUncategorized

Competing needs

Author’s note: I’m sorry this got posted in an unfinished version. I swear I’d finished it, but somehow my last additions got lost and an unfinished but saved version got posted.   I’m a big fan of inclusion as a principle in school. If you’re not familiar with the concepts, …

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Critical ThinkingFeaturedPrimary EducationReligionUncategorized

Going Up Against the Good News Club: An Interview with Dan Courtney

Dan Courtney is President Emeritus of the Freethinkers of Upstate New York and is active in a number of Freethought and church/state separation groups. Dan gained international attention for being the first Atheist to offer an invocation at the Town of Greece following the US Supreme Court’s ruling on the …

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Critical ThinkingCross-postEducationUncategorized

Sophisticated Educators, Please Stand Up

People have been talking about false dichotomies in math education forever, it seems. And so have I (as long as you think of seven years ago as “forever”). And so has Professor David Clarke! His paper, titled Using International Research to Contest Prevalent Oppositional Dichotomies, was published in 2006, and …

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Excel Example of filtering at work
EducationPedagogySecondary EducationTechnologyUncategorized

Use Microsoft Excel to be More Data Driven (Part I)

As a teacher, one of my tasks is to assess how well students are comprehending the material I am teaching. There are many ways to assess student comprehension, but this post will focus on using Microsoft Excel to extract meaningful information from formal assessment data.  I am defining a formal …

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Classroom of student from the late 1800's
Uncategorized

The academic “year”

Schooling in many places occurs during the colder winter months due to the need for the children of farmers to work during the summers. K-12 schools provide 180 days of teaching with the summer off as a result.  Colleges and universities follow a roughly similar schedule, but offer classes over …

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Required ReadingsUncategorized

Preschool lessons, Bible studies, teacher training, book banning, and time tracking: Required Readings, 11.30.14

I hope all of the U.S. School of Doubters had a lovely Thanksgiving break. May you all slide through the end of the semester like a hot knife through butter. But first, your Required Readings: What can other schools learn from preschools? Non-academic skills and social and emotional topics, such as …

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Photograph of a piece of chalk resting on a dusty tray at the bottom of a blackboard.
Required ReadingsUncategorized

Peer-reviewed expletives, error-filled ed data, frat bans, college costs, and the Newtown shooter: Required Readings, 11.23.14

Wondering about whether that journal asking you to submit a manuscript is a legit open access resource? Well, if it accepts an article titled “Get me off your f^[#ing mailing list” consisting of nothing but that phrase written over and over, you might want to send your research elsewhere. Data-driven education …

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EducationHigher EducationPedagogySecondary EducationTechnologyUncategorized

MOOCs, A High School Teacher’s Perspective

If you haven’t heard of MOOCs yet, welcome to the education blogosphere, it’s nice to have you here!  The New Yorker recently wrote an article challenging the mission and execution of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) offered at places like Coursera, Udacity, EdX, and Khan Academy.  It so happens that …

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Required ReadingsUncategorized

Sagan Day, creationism in Scotland, guns on campus, and more: Required Readings 11.09.14

Happy Carl Sagan Day, which has developed into a time to pay special attention and homage to critical thinking, science communication, curiosity, and skepticism. In other words, all of the things we love at School of Doubt. Sagan would have turned 80 years old today. On Tuesday, November 11, the Scottish …

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Uncategorized

Pop Quiz: Modeling professionalism

I seriously want to pull my blanky up over my head and pretend the semester isn’t starting.   But I have to be a professional.  At the time this post goes up, I will have taught my first class this fall so I hope all want well. In fact, I expect …

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