• Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 10 months ago

    Or Tecamachalco (at least, back when I was growing up in Mexico City; looks like we can start a club of folks who grew up or live there). I heard it a bit more, but then I gew up *in* the Jewish community, so any incident would make the rounds. And recently a friend of my mom’s who had her passport stolen went to the Consulate in Houston to get it…[Read more]

    • So, all of you in the Mexican club Arturo just started… Why are you not commenting over at Esceptica.org as well?

      Sorry, let me say it correctly:

      ¿¿¿Why are you not commenting at Escéptica???

      (The correct punctuation makes all the difference).

  • Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 10 months ago

    Hmmm… the orthodox community in Guatemala are the Lev Tahor; they settled in Guatemala because they were fleeing summons from courts in Canada (they had first moved from Quebec to Ontario to escape charges, then to Guatemala to escape judgements from Ontario judges). They also practice teenage weddings (they claim they are consensual, there is…[Read more]

    • I knew they came to Guatemala from Canada, but didn’t remember the circumstances.
      The articles I read didn’t really paint them as victims. They said that the Maya villagers felt these guys looked down on them because they didn’t say hello and didn’t get involved in the community (maybe for racist reasons? maybe religious reasons?). Hardly a…[Read more]

      • Well, supposedly, the women were also asking Mayan women why they didn’t have more children, which could qualify as harassment.

        Should be noted that Atitlan already had a small Sephardic community, which is not being asked to leave.

        Lev Tahor left Canada fearing child abuse and child neglect charges, due to their tendency to shut their…[Read more]

    • I notice that the Raw Story article (original source: International Business News) carefully omits any mention of what sort of “religious freedom” they (Lev Tahor) weren’t getting in Canada. (Look up “Lev Tahor” in Wikipedia for details.) Given that glaring omission, I’m inclined to suspect that it also leaves out the details that would make the…[Read more]

  • Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 10 months ago

    Tyrion is more than just a competent administrator: he is truly smart and cunning in the same mold as Tywin. Hence her aunt’s comment to Tywin that he only had one real son, and that was Tywin. With Cersei, it is certainly the case she is overlooked because she is a woman, and she is expected to exert her influence in the manner in which women are…[Read more]

  • Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 10 months ago

    Minor comment: in the books, it is not at all clear that Cersei hates Robert when she marries him; in fact, what she claims suggests that she was at least infatuated with him, but that his actions (including being drunk during their wedding night, saying someone else’s name during the consummation, and then promptly falling asleep, as well as…[Read more]

    • Well, in the books, she makes it clear she wants to be queen more than anything. Not that marriages of convenience are necessarily horrible for the woman; Alys Karstark, for instance, chooses her own husband, but it’s very much for political reasons.

      I should add that at the time, Robert was Lord Baratheon; remember, the Baratheons were…[Read more]

  • Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 11 months ago

    Just to be clear: it’s an awesome, impressive achievement! The Fields Medal is absolutely one of the top prizes in Mathematics (and one could make a good case for it being the top prize). It’s just weird to refer to it as “highest medal in mathematics”.

  • Arturo Magidin posted a new activity comment 3 years, 11 months ago

    Nitpick: There aren’t that many “medals” in Mathematics. The Fields Medal was once considered the highest prize in Mathematics, often described as the “mathematics nobel prize”, but that is somewhat misleading since there are eligibility conditions on the Fields Medal (recipient must be younger than 40 on January 1st of the year the medal is…[Read more]

    • Just to be clear: it’s an awesome, impressive achievement! The Fields Medal is absolutely one of the top prizes in Mathematics (and one could make a good case for it being the top prize). It’s just weird to refer to it as “highest medal in mathematics”.