Lesson Plans

A Lesson in Critical Lunching (Overview)

At first, I was horrified when I read the articles. Another teacher had assigned my students some readings that were full of logical fallacies, misleading information, and inappropriately cited scientific studies. The horrifying prospect was that I now had to use those articles in my own classes, and I would …

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Required Readings

Climate change ed, discriminating vouchers, Wikipedagogy, consent in the classroom, and more: Required Readings, 06.29.16

Two bills in Congress (one each in the Senate and the House) would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to establish a climate change education program. Meanwhile, one senator has inserted language into an appropriations bill that would prohibit the Justice Department from enforcing key provisions of the Americans with Disabilities …

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Pedagogy

Defending Bloom

Some of the most cited criticisms against Bloom’s taxonomy were written by Brenda Sugrue, PhD. She presents three main criticisms and two alternatives to Bloom. However, her criticisms are problematic. Sugrue’s first criticism is that Bloom’s taxonomy is invalid, citing that it is almost 50 years old (at the time …

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Pedagogy

To Bloom or Not to Bloom

It’s something that almost all teachers learn at some point in their training. But is it all it’s cracked up to be? Bloom’s taxonomy is a system of organizing educational objectives into a hierarchical model based on their complexity. The basic premise is that some kinds of learning are different …

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Required Readings

College cost calculator, “treasonous” activism in India, low ACT essay scores, evaluating Super Bowl ads, Texas BoE candidate, and scholarly publishing: Required Readings, 02.16.16

For parents, teachers, and anyone who knows a high school student considering a four-year institution: A college cost calculator that personalizes U.S. Department of Education data based on state and family income. Campus activism in India is drawing a great deal of debate and activity, including charges of sedition and criminal conspiracy against …

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Snowstorm of 1922
Required Readings

Drowning bunnies, free speech in British unis, LA budget woes, non-weather school closings, and skeptical parenting: Required Readings, 01.25.16

The president of a Catholic university suggested in a discussion about student retention that faculty stop thinking of freshmen as “cuddly bunnies,” noting: “You just have to drown the bunnies” by removing students more likely of dropping out, preferably before the late September date when enrollment statistics must be reported to the …

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Culture

On Activism

My philosophy towards teaching is that it is a sort of sacrosanct profession. It is something that is too important to take lightly and a teacher should never overstep the bounds of his or her subject. This particular thinking of mine resulted from having, in public (state-funded) schools, my own …

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Critical Thinking

A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 2

Quentis and Firmatio: A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 2 Continued from Part 1.   Quentis: Sure, but science doesn’t know everything. There’s a lot of things that western science doesn’t understand. Being able to fly if you jump three times is one of those things. Scientists don’t even know how bees …

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School yard bully kicking a ball at three others
Required Readings

MOOCs, liberal indoctrination, #charlestonsyllabus, TX BOE chair, King & King controversy, y mas: Required Readings, 06.28.15

Hat tip to School of Doubt’s mother ship, Skepchick, for this article on the role MOOCs are playing in the professional development of educators. Turning Point USA, a conservative activist organization, wants to teach college students how to avoid indoctrination by “liberal professors.” You can view their offerings here. A Brandeis …

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Critical Thinking

A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 1

Quentis and Firmatio: A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 1   Quentis: Okay, if you jump three times, you can fly. Firmatio: That sounds dubious to me. Quentis: No, really. My grandmother told me about it, and her grandmother told her. It’s a family tradition that goes back thousands of years. Firmatio: …

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