Pedagogy

To Bloom or Not to Bloom

It’s something that almost all teachers learn at some point in their training. But is it all it’s cracked up to be? Bloom’s taxonomy is a system of organizing educational objectives into a hierarchical model based on their complexity. The basic premise is that some kinds of learning are different …

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Required Readings

College cost calculator, “treasonous” activism in India, low ACT essay scores, evaluating Super Bowl ads, Texas BoE candidate, and scholarly publishing: Required Readings, 02.16.16

For parents, teachers, and anyone who knows a high school student considering a four-year institution: A college cost calculator that personalizes U.S. Department of Education data based on state and family income. Campus activism in India is drawing a great deal of debate and activity, including charges of sedition and criminal conspiracy against …

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Snowstorm of 1922
Required Readings

Drowning bunnies, free speech in British unis, LA budget woes, non-weather school closings, and skeptical parenting: Required Readings, 01.25.16

The president of a Catholic university suggested in a discussion about student retention that faculty stop thinking of freshmen as “cuddly bunnies,” noting: “You just have to drown the bunnies” by removing students more likely of dropping out, preferably before the late September date when enrollment statistics must be reported to the …

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Culture

On Activism

My philosophy towards teaching is that it is a sort of sacrosanct profession. It is something that is too important to take lightly and a teacher should never overstep the bounds of his or her subject. This particular thinking of mine resulted from having, in public (state-funded) schools, my own …

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Critical Thinking

A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 2

Quentis and Firmatio: A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 2 Continued from Part 1.   Quentis: Sure, but science doesn’t know everything. There’s a lot of things that western science doesn’t understand. Being able to fly if you jump three times is one of those things. Scientists don’t even know how bees …

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School yard bully kicking a ball at three others
Required Readings

MOOCs, liberal indoctrination, #charlestonsyllabus, TX BOE chair, King & King controversy, y mas: Required Readings, 06.28.15

Hat tip to School of Doubt’s mother ship, Skepchick, for this article on the role MOOCs are playing in the professional development of educators. Turning Point USA, a conservative activist organization, wants to teach college students how to avoid indoctrination by “liberal professors.” You can view their offerings here. A Brandeis …

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Critical Thinking

A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 1

Quentis and Firmatio: A Skeptatic Dialogue, Part 1   Quentis: Okay, if you jump three times, you can fly. Firmatio: That sounds dubious to me. Quentis: No, really. My grandmother told me about it, and her grandmother told her. It’s a family tradition that goes back thousands of years. Firmatio: …

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Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking for Parrots

Not actual parrots, I’m referring to humans who repeat words over and over without actually knowing what they mean. Specifically the phrase “critical thinking.” This is a very popular buzzphrase in education. So popular that I constantly see it used by people who have no idea how to actually practice …

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Required Readings

Formulating questions, 1st grade math instruction, LSEA remains, bankrupt colleges, and more: Required Readings, 04.26.15

The Question Formulation Technique helps teachers guide students in developing and asking “the right questions” to nurture students’ curiosity and ability to think in questions. New research analysis suggests that “teacher-directed mathematics instruction in first grade is superior to other methods for students with ‘math difficulties.’” To follow up on an …

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Critical ThinkingEducationPrimary EducationScience

Tackling Science Project Turmoil

Science Fairs can sometimes get a bad rap. As a recent viral image illustrates, these school projects are often met with dread by students, families, and yes – even teachers. But I’d like to propose that science projects – done properly – are a valuable tool in teaching children how …

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