Required Readings

Illegal aliens in academic libraries, first secular chair, research guide to Lemonade, international students, unemployed law graduates, and more: Required Readings, 05.29.16

A move by the House of Representatives will require the Library of Congress to retain the term “illegal alien” for cataloging and search purposes, reversing the library’s plan to replace the term with less prejudicial identifiers, such as “noncitizens” or “unauthorized immigration.” How does this relate to education? Most college and university libraries …

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Education

Academic Dishonesty

Dan wrote a good post on Academic Dishonesty a while back. Mine doesn’t address the administrative side at all so I’d recommend reading his for that. My planned post for this week is delayed because this distracted me: Yesterday I began grading my first big writing assignment of the year. I got …

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Required Readings

Online teaching tools, triggers, college ratings, plagiarism, and community colleges: Required Readings, 12.21.14

Happy solstice, whether it be winter or summer where you are! We ran across a couple cool education-related web tools this week: one for students and teachers of English, and the other regarding environmental health and toxicology. In addition, citizen science can interest learners of all ages. To pick up a thread of …

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Required Readings

Plagiarism, support for higher education, anti-cheating efforts, and The Onion: Required Readings for 8.5.14

Plagiarism and copyright have been much on my mind thanks to a 4-week course on copyright for educators and the process of developing a scientific writing lecture for future medical practitioners. So I found this “field guide” to defenses and other public statements from accused plagiarizers interesting and a little …

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Required Readings

Charter school PR, freeform study, coding, a glittering bible curriculum, the lionfish story, and plagiarism: Required Readings, 7.22.14

Today’s case study in critical thinking and information evaluation comes to us from the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, which distributed an 18-page “messaging notebook” at a recent conference. Among the contents is a “Say This, Not This” section that suggests replacing words like application and consumers for, respectively, enrollment form and families. …

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Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz: To Catch a Cheater

“I learned that teachers aren’t as stupid as some people think they are…” This quote, from a student caught cheating, comes from a fairly old article from the US News called The Cheating Game.  It outlines a widespread problem in the country with regards to students cheating in school. Even …

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EducationHigher EducationPop Quiz

Pop Quiz: Academic (Dis)honesty

Summer is winding down, and for many of us this means a return to teaching, complete with its associated joys and horrors.* By far the worst of these horrors, at least in my opinion, is dealing with exam cheating and plagiarism. There is absolutely nothing about the whole process that …

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