Pedagogy

Don’t Teach “Evaluating Sources”

Okay, so that title was a bit of an attention getter. I’m not going to say that you shouldn’t teach students how to evaluate sources at all, just not necessarily when you think you should. Teachers are faced with the task of figuring out exactly what aspects of their subjects …

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Critical ThinkingCross-post

Intuition and Domain Knowledge

Can you guess what the graphs at the right show? I’ll give you a couple of hints: (1) each graph measures performance on a different task, (2) one pair of bars in each graph—left or right—represents participants who used their intuition on the task, while the other pair of bars …

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Critical ThinkingCross-postEducationPedagogy

Telling Vs. No Telling

So, with that in mind, let’s move on to just one of the dichotomies in education, that of “telling” vs. “no telling,” and I hope the reader will forgive my leaving Clarke’s paper behind. I recommend it to you for its international perspective on what we discuss below. “Reports of …

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Critical ThinkingEducationPrimary EducationScience

Tackling Science Project Turmoil

Science Fairs can sometimes get a bad rap. As a recent viral image illustrates, these school projects are often met with dread by students, families, and yes – even teachers. But I’d like to propose that science projects – done properly – are a valuable tool in teaching children how …

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Pedagogy

A Quick Guide to Due Diligence

I want to be a good skeptic and a good teacher, but I have a thousand tasks to do both in and out of the classroom and things like “fact-checking” get relegated to the procrastination pile. In a perfect world, I would make sure I’m not unintentionally passing on any …

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Required Readings

AP history in OK, dealing with drugs on campus, faculty support to students, budget cuts, and parenting research: Required Readings, 02.22.15

Probably the biggest story in education and critical thinking over the past week was an Oklahoma bill that would cut state funding for the Advanced Placement history course in high schools because the bill’s author (and others) believes it emphasizes “what is bad about America” and characterizes the United States as …

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Required Readings

Balanced literacy, creation museum field trip, and social media data: Required Readings, 7.1.14

Happy First of July, SoD readers! Filed under “All that is old is new again,” the head of New York City’s public school system is promoting a shift back toward balanced literacy instruction. This educational approach is based on the idea that children are natural readers and writers and that teachers …

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Image of 15th-c. scribe Jean Miélot
Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz: Work work vs. non-work work

Happy Monday, everyone! Like many academics I often find myself occupied with activities that do not quite fall under my primary job description. In fact, these activities sometimes seem to take up the majority of my time, a situation which is easy to justify as they often seem related to …

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Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz: Where has teaching taken you?

Happy Canada Day / Bonne fête du Canada to all our Canadian readers! I’m just getting ready to leave on a conference/research trip to Italy, which I’ve always thought was by far the best perk of my job (hint to future academics: study things that are in places you like …

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Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz: How do you manage your time?

Every year it seems I run into the same bit of fallacious reasoning: “Well, once the semester is over and I have fewer distractions, I’ll be able to just breeze through my research!” Suffice it to say, things aren’t as breezy as they could be. I’m finding it difficult to …

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