Required Readings

Homework benefits, student loan protest, teacher turnover, Rolling Stone smackdown, and more: Required Readings, 04.05.15

Good morning Required Readers! Spanish researchers found that more is not necessarily better regarding math and science homework, as measured by standardized test scores. The point at which time spent on homework began to negatively correlate to scores, generally speaking: about 70 minutes. To protest what they see as fraudulent practices, …

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Series of Books
Required Readings

College sport myths, science un-fairs, student power, no more biblical thoughts for the day, SXSWedu, and more: Required Readings, 03.15.15

In honor of yesterday’s release of the NCAA men’s basketball brackets, we’d like to begin today’s RR with 5 myths about college sports. This idea probably won’t come as a surprise to many of our readers, but many believe that Science Fairs Aren’t So Fair. Why Do American Students Have So …

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Required Readings

McCollum anniversary, Common Core, library grants, opting out of homework, and more: Required Readings, 03.08.15

Yesterday marked 67 years since the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in McCollum v. Board of Education, which found that “the use of public school facilities by religious organizations to give religious instruction to school children violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.” The documentary The Lord Is Not on Trial …

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Pen and doodle
Required Readings

Burning out, school as refuge, religious mentoring, sticky teaching, overdone science PR, and special education assistance: Required Readings, 12.14.14

Welcome to another week of Required Readings! Burning up the Internet this week has been the repost of a 2013 blog column from a former teacher entitled “The day I knew for sure I was burned out.” I daresay she was not the first person whose final straw involved a …

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Required Readings

Pearl Harbor resources, #FergusonSyllabus, Nature public access, athletics, and the worst U.S. college: Required Readings, 12.07.14

In honor of today’s anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Required Readings begins with a collection of primary source materials from the Education Department at the National World War II Museum. The site also includes lesson plans and other teaching resources, examples of student projects, virtual exhibits, and materials on science and …

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Required ReadingsUncategorized

Sagan Day, creationism in Scotland, guns on campus, and more: Required Readings 11.09.14

Happy Carl Sagan Day, which has developed into a time to pay special attention and homage to critical thinking, science communication, curiosity, and skepticism. In other words, all of the things we love at School of Doubt. Sagan would have turned 80 years old today. On Tuesday, November 11, the Scottish …

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A multiple-choice exam
Required Readings

Satanists in Florida schools, academic freedom, inequality on campus, BYOD, and more: Required Readings, 9.16.14

The Satanic Temple of Orange County, Florida, will be distributing copies of The Satanic Children’s Big Book of Activities in county schools in the wake of a court decision stating that if the schools allowed Christian groups to disseminate Bibles and Christian-oriented religious materials, they would also have to allow atheist and other groups …

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Girls in class
Required Readings

Predatory publishers, disabilities and jobhunting, Spamalot, adjuncts, et al: Required Readings, 8.26-27.14

If I were grading myself for SoD, I would have just dropped my grade by a letter for turning in my assignment late with no real excuse (I completely forgot in a mess of a Tuesday). So to make up for my lapse, here’s an extra credit-worthy Required Readings. One …

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Required Readings

Plagiarism, support for higher education, anti-cheating efforts, and The Onion: Required Readings for 8.5.14

Plagiarism and copyright have been much on my mind thanks to a 4-week course on copyright for educators and the process of developing a scientific writing lecture for future medical practitioners. So I found this “field guide” to defenses and other public statements from accused plagiarizers interesting and a little …

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Required Readings

Information evaluation, competency-based ed, E-rate, school to prison, and textbook troubles: Required Readings, 7.15.14

As part of my role as a librarian, I teach varying levels of humanity how to evaluate the reliability of information with which they are presented, whether on the web or in print. Harriet Hall’s Science-Based Medicine article may not be related to education or teaching, strictly speaking, but the guidance she …

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